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This week on Cargo

CN/092— May 21 2019

I will not reason and compare: my business is to create.





 
Ukrainian photographers, Tania Shcheglova and Roman Noven (aka Synchrodogs) follow their own star — subsequently theirs is a unique vision — raw, spectral, clever, ravishing, celebratory, thoughtful, and at times even a bit camp. All in all they are super talented and inspiring (they seem to work without fear). 👽🖖






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Amandine David


Lukas Haider


Minchaya Chayosumrit






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Affection(s)

Choices incidental, uncalculated and correct


Wandering around within the Synchrodogs frame of mind (see above) roused in us the following short but galvanizing line from William Blake’s 1804 poem, Jerusalem:

I will not reason and compare: my business is to create. 

Image: Jean Giraud, aka Moebius



This week on Cargo

CN/091— May 14 2019

The ebb and flow of the solitary and the collaborative





 
What a calm and pondering site Australian artist James Wright has produced. And his work, such an intimate ebb and flow from the solitary to the collaborative. ⛵






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Tony Luong


Esther Hovers


Mortis Studio






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Affection(s)

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One by Kafka (from his Blue Octavo Notebooks, 1917-1919):

Leopards break into the temple and drink to the dregs what is in the sacrificial pitchers; this is repeated over and over again; finally it can be calculated in advance, and it becomes a part of the ceremony. 


Image: Peter Phillips, Impeller, 1972



This week on Cargo

CN/090 — May 7 2019

A powerful alien eye





 
The camera is the most significant aspect of a photograph as well as the most hidden. The concealment is not dishonest though, it is of course practical — but it does undermine photography’s main conceit: capturing the world. The photographs of Petra van der Ree are a strange version in that they don’t necessarily capture but they do approximate our experience of the seen world.

One knows when looking at Ms. van der Ree’s images that they are seeing the unaltered surface of this planet yet all seems totally staged — almost polished. We volley that though her camera is not visible, she smartly makes the mechanistic nature of the camera a foremost aspect, causing what’s in view to feel cleaner and initially less emotional. But this cold, camera who fell to earth vibe is reversed almost immediately by her poetic gift to place this powerful alien eye. ☯






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Christina Hutchings


Theresa Meiying Liu


Sarah Discours






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Affection(s)

Choices incidental, uncalculated and correct


That’s the whole point. What can we do to make an image of ourselves stick all over us, take shape, remain fixed long enough… Yes, for us to be able to contemplate it… A beautiful image… Oh, not even beautiful… an image of ourselves that we would love just as it is… That wouldn’t be transformed into an enormous shifting mass… Which contains everything… in which so many dissimilar things collide, destroy each other…

Nathalie Sarraute, You Don’t Love Yourself, 1990

Image: Jean Cocteau, Testament of Orpheus, 1960



This week on Cargo

CN/089 — Apr 30 2019

Childhood and adulthood are just one long and curious day






In the past of every person is the perspective of a child. A child’s view is mostly a condition of wonder and curiosity — the adult world has little time for either — as neither are immediately profitable. The adult most often repudiates their younger self with some sort of puffed-up knowing offset by grotesque sentimental back glances. However there are occasional artists (mostly writers, Marcel Proust and Bruno Schulz come to mind) who know that adulthood and childhood are not separate but something like one long and curious day.

The works of art-director, photographer and writer Kirill Gluschenko fall into this latter, admirable grouping. Though his subject matter is the crumbly, modernist architecture of the collapsed Soviet utopia, read his writing and you will see that his perspective is not sentimental or merely archival — but a gorgeous overlay of a child’s awe and a poet’s ability to savor complexity. Not to mention Gluschenko is blessed with the rare combination of having something to say with the ability to say it really well.
🇷🇺🖖





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Ed Harland


Ruoxi Li


Levi Hammett






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Affection(s)

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Reading some of the writing of Kirill Gluschenko (see our Staff Pick above) brought to mind the William Wordsworth poem: My Heart Leaps Up (1807). And though his subject matter is not rainbows in the sky but bold edifices of modernist concrete — we feel strongly that he would appreciate and understand the following lines. 

Image from Wim Wender’s Paris Texas, 1984
My heart leaps up when I behold
        A rainbow in the sky:
So was it when my life began;
So is it now I am a man;
So be it when I shall grow old,
        Or let me die!
The Child is father of the Man;
And I could wish my days to be
Bound each to each by natural piety.